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Who is a veterinary dermatologist

A veterinary dermatologist is a veterinarian who has been trained, sat an difficult examination and is entitled European Veterinary Specialists in skin disease. This also includes ear disease, claws, oral and anogenital mucous membranes, hair coat and subcutaneous tissues. It is a large medical speciality with hundreds of known skin diseases, including infectious, parasitical, allergic, auto-immune, ear disease, seborrhoeic diseases, skin tumors and many other. Some skin diseases may be inherited or have a genetic background, some may be contagious and yet other are acquired or has an unknown background.

What does “Diplomate” or “Board certified” mean?

Qualified veterinarians with a few years of clinical experience (internship or similar) and a strong interest in dermatology can apply for a residency to further develop their competence in this field. A residency provides a minimum of 3 years of intense speciality training including handling clinical cases, participation in many courses and congresses, doing active research and lecturing. In order to become a Diplomate of the ECVD (often abbreviated Dip ECVD and also known as board certified or European Specialist in Veterinary Dermatology) the resident must pass a rigorous four-part, two–day examination. The Diplomate is re-evaluated regarding professional activity including research and further education every 5 years to make sure he/she keep up with new research and other development in the field.

When should you contact a European Specialist in Veterinary Dermatologist?

The most common way to come in contact with a Dip ECVD is by your primary care veterinarian; he will refer your animal because of skin disease. Reasons for referral include complex skin disease, specialized diagnostic or therapeutic options or simply to obtain judicious advice for a chronic common skin problem. Usually the animal will have a few appointments with the specialist before being referred back to the primary care veterinarian. In this way, primary care veterinarians and specialists work together to provide you and your pet with the best care!

It is also possible to book an appointment for your animal directly at the specialist clinic without going through a referring veterinarian.